Chair of Theology

“Through research and teaching the students are educated in the various disciplines so as to become truly competent in the specific sectors in which they will devote themselves to the service of society and of the Church, but at the same time prepared to give the witness of their faith to the world.” (Ex Corde Ecclesiae, 20)

 

“Theology plays a particularly important role in the search for a synthesis of knowledge as well as in the dialogue between faith and reason. It serves all other disciplines in their search for meaning, not only by helping them to investigate how their discoveries will affect individuals and society but also by bringing a perspective and an orientation not contained within their own methodologies.” (Ex Corde Ecclesiae, 19)

 

And this is the very specific quality of theology at this university: to synthesise knowledge and provide adequate links between discoveries and concrete life. This is even more clearly defined by the Congregation for Catholic Education in its working document (Instrumentum laboris) Educare oggi e domani– Educating Today and Tomorrow (2014), where it expands this task to all university professors:

 

“Catholic university professors are called upon to provide an original contribution to overcome the fragmentation of specialized knowledge, favoring dialogue amongst the various disciplines, looking for a unitarian reconciliation of knowledge, which is never fixed but constantly evolving; in this task, they should be guided by the awareness of the one single underlying meaning of all things. Within this dialogue, theology provides an essential contribution.”(2.f)

 

At the university, theology gives students an opportunity to integrate their knowledge into a broader context where fundamental issues are raised and continuous dialogue between faith and reason takes place. A student – “gentleman” applies his own knowledge into a broader intellectual context recognising its practical nature within theological discourse itself. The Chair of Theology has the task of developing critical thinking about the student’s own religious being within the framework of new insights he gains that are based on scientific research and study. The deepening of his own scientific field does not distance the student from himself, from the issues every human being asks himself, but rather links and integrates him in the community of the faithful making him a witness of faith.

 

Furthermore, synthesising his own knowledge and integrating it into a larger whole that concerns his existence as a believer, the student trains himself for serving the Church and society. He serves the Church and society submitting his own scientific discoveries and research to them. He also “assists the Church, enabling it to come to a better knowledge of diverse cultures, discern their positive and negative aspects, to receive their authentically human contributions, and to develop means by which it can make the faith better understood by the men and women of a particular culture“ (Ex Corde Ecclesiae, 44).

 

Theology can reveal itself to the student as the beauty of pluralism of texts within the Tradition (Gospel reports themselves abound in a pluralism of interpretations of events featuring Jesus Christ), which is passed on in a lively and dynamic way, as a source of experiences of those who before us in different and not always harmonised ways coped with the same or similar problems as we do today; as a reality which should not remain somewhere on the sidelines, on the margins of own lives, but as a reality, which in the dynamics of belief and understanding of faith finds answers to the questions about the meaning, and a reality that primarily comprises practical religious life – care for the weak and helpless and changes of unjust conditions in society.

In that sense, theology is life’s interpretation of the texts from the Scriptures, as well as of other texts that are the essence for understanding theology because it reveals itself to the student as an inexhaustible wealth of ideas, conclusions, questions, problems which directly correlate with everyday life experience. Theology is therefore no dry interpretation of texts from the Scriptures, or a summary of dogmatic teachings of the Church, but rather a live witness, by no means homogenous, of strained conflicts in the early Church, open conflicts of bishops at the early Church’s councils, lucid and thorough explanations of fundamental existential issues. Moreover, in this way, dogma is the quintessence of living and contemplated experiences of faith of those who coped with these questions before us. After all, theological research cannot be exhausted. Hermeneutics of the Scriptures is an inexhaustible source of new truths for each human being. The Scriptures, the Word of God, although read dozens of times, speak out in always new ways just because this is the Live Word, because this is not a text written on a piece of paper, but rather the Word spoken by God.

 

The integral text entitled “The Importance and Place of the Chair of Theology at the Croatian Catholic University” by Prof. Dr. Željko Tanjić and Associate Prof. Dr. Zoran Turza can be accessed at the following link.

 

Syllabus – Chair of Theology

 

Introduction to Theology

Getting acquainted with the basic guidelines and basic concepts of theology as a science and its interrelation with other (especially humanist and social) sciences, with special reference to: (a) sources and methods within theological disciplines; (b) relations between reason and faith; (c) Christian revelation; (d) the Church’s Magisterium; (e) diversity of theological branches; (f) theology and Christian life.

 

This course is intended for students of the following years of study:

Undergraduate university study in history, 1st year,

Undergraduate university study in psychology, 1st year,

Undergraduate university study in sociology, 1st year,

Undergraduate university study in communication sciences, 1st year,

Undergraduate university study in nursing, 1st year (full-time and part-time study).

 

Introduction to Bioethics

Familiarising with the causes of the emergence of bioethics, its historical development, definition and method, main approaches and paradigms, and its place within the field of science and society.

This course is intended for students of the following years of study:

Undergraduate university study in history, 2nd year,

Undergraduate university study in psychology, 1st year,

Undergraduate university study in sociology, 2nd year,

Undergraduate university study in communication sciences, 2nd year,

Undergraduate university study in nursing, 2nd year (part-time study).

 

Social Teaching of the Church

Understanding the nature of the Church’s social teaching, insight into its historical development, overview of fundamental principles, overview of major social topics in the context of social teaching, and familiarising with the principal Church documents on social teaching.

This course is intended for students of the following years of study:

Undergraduate university study in history, 3rd year,

Undergraduate university study in psychology, 1st year,

Undergraduate university study in sociology, 3rd year.

 

Main theological topics

Within biblical, historical, systematic and practical theology, key topics are covered (from exegesis and biblical theology, history of dogma and patrology, fundamental theology, dogmatic theology, moral theology, pastoral theology, liturgics, religious pedagogy) providing answers to questions about the historical foundation of faith; historical path of faith; meaning and unity of the revelatory-redeeming event; the way it is grafted into the present.

This course is intended for students of the following years of study:

Undergraduate university study in sociology, 3rd year,

Undergraduate university study in communication sciences, 2nd year.

 

Theology in Dialogue

This course offers insights into the most significant authors of the 20th century whose theories influenced the understanding of religion. The focus of attention is on their theories linked to religion and their theological reception. Students will get acquainted with relations between theology and the basic ideas of Karl Marx, the link between theology and Auguste Comte’s sociological theory, the influence of Friedrich Nietzsche’s philosophy on theology, the link between Sigmund Freud’s discoveries and theology, the theological reception of Max Weber’s sociological theory, theology’s stand towards Martin Heidegger and Jürgen Habermas, the link between hermeneutics and theology, the relationship between post-modern authors and theology and finally the link between Giorgio Agamben’s philosophy and theology.

This course is intended for students of the following years of study:

Graduate university study in sociology, 1st and 2nd year, elective subject.

 

Theological Anthropology

A systematic presentation of theological speech of man and human community in light of God’s revelation, the Church’s tradition and theological courses.

This course is intended for students of the following years of study:

Graduate university study in nursing, 1st year (part-time)

 

Theological Aspects of Dying and Death

Familiarising with forms of dying and historical understandings of death. Understanding different forms of dealing with the end of life. Coping with different views on death: philosophical, religious, social. Knowledge of fundamental contemporary discussions on dying and death.

This course is intended for students of the following years of study:

Graduate university study in nursing, 1st year (part-time).

 

Nursing Philosophy and Ethics

The basic objective of this course is to acquaint students with the development of morality and development of ethics as a philosophical discipline, development of ethics in nursing and bioethics. Students will be acquainted with the identity, theories and models of nursing, the historical development of nursing and professional ethics in nursing practice.

This course is intended for students of the following years of study:

Undergraduate university study in nursing, 1st year (full-time and part-time).

 

The Church in the Modern World

This course is intended for students of the following years of study:

Graduate university study in history, 2nd year (direction: Contemporary History).

 

Academic Staff – Chair of Theology

Clicking the name, you open an overview with contact details.

 

Prof. Dr. Željko Tanjić, Rector

 

Assistant Prof. Dr. Zoran Turza

 

Dr. Anto Čartolovni, Postdoctoral Researcher

Dr. Marijana Kompes, Postdoctoral Researcher

Dr. Josip Markotić, Postdoctoral Researcher

Valentina Šipuš, Assistant

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